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While forecasting methods and weather tools are continuously improving, many of our operating states border the Atlantic and Gulf coasts which can be at a greater risk from tropical storms and hurricanes.

The only thing worse than being in a storm is being unprepared when one strikes. We’re here to help prepare you, your family, and your home during this hurricane season.

Terms You Need to Know

  • Tropical Storm: An organized system of strong thunderstorms with strong circulation and wind speeds of 39-73 mph.
  • Tropical Storm Watch: Tropical storm conditions, including winds of 39-73 mph, are possible and can pose a threat to the area within 48 hours.
  • Tropical Storm Warning: Tropical storm conditions are expected within 36 hours.
  • Hurricane: Very strong, pronounced circulating winds of 74 mph or more and gusts up to 200 mph. Hurricanes are classified into five categories based on sustained winds and storm surges.
  • Hurricane Watch: Hurricane conditions are a real possibility for the area, usually within 48 hours.
  • Hurricane Warning: Hurricane conditions are expected within 36 hours.
  • Evacuation order: The direction given by government officials to leave an area threatened by a storm. This direction depends on the storm’s track and projected surge.
  • Storm Surge: Storm surge is an abnormal rise of water generated by a storm, over and above the predicted astronomical tides.

The Atlantic Hurricane Season lasts from June 1 to November 30, and it’s never too early to prepare in case of a storm. Two keys to weather safety are to be prepared and to have a plan in place in case action is needed. Here are a few things to think about:

  • Although it’s unlikely that a storm would cut off your food supply for this long, it’s important to house an emergency supply of non-perishable foods that will last two weeks. If you can’t store this quantity, store as much as you can.
  • Have an evacuation route in place for you and your family.
  • Plan ahead where you will take your pets, as most shelters do not admit them. Reach out to your local Humane Society for more information.
  • Keep trees and shrubs trimmed to limit damage they can cause to property.
  • Secure all lightweight items outside as they can become dangerous missiles when winds begin to increase.

During the Storm

When a storm is in full force, remember to follow these safety tips:

  • Stay up to date by following hurricane reports on a battery-operated radio or television.
  • Stay indoors and away from windows.
  • Do not use electric appliances, including your computer.
  • If flooding threatens your home, turn off electricity at the main breaker.
  • If authorities say to evacuate, do so immediately.

After the Storm

Please remember that just because the storm has passed doesn’t mean its safe. After the storm remember to:

  • Remain inside until authorities say it’s safe.
  • Do not attempt to walk or drive through flooded areas as there could be hidden dangers.
  • Keep away from loose or dangling power lines and report them immediately to the power company.
  • Inspect your home for damage. Take pictures of damage, both of the building and its contents, for insurance purposes.
  • Publix stores in the affected area may be closed during the storm, but will reopen when it is safe to do so. Our status page will be updated on our availability during this time.

Expert Resources

When a storm strikes, it’s important to be prepared. Do you have a plan of action for you and your family if one should hit?

Sasha W.

Written by

Sasha W. began her career at Publix in 2007 as a cashier and has since gained experience in both Event Planning and Social Media – which is perfect, because the combination of those two interests are what drive the writing behind her favorite blog posts! A New England girl turned southern belle, Sasha loves taking her puppy on tropical adventures all throughout Florida. Describing herself as fifty percent manatee and fifty percent flamingo, Sasha hopes to bring fun and unique ideas to your future events!

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